The Resource Accomack County (Va.) powers of attorney and letters relating to slaves of Bull and Warner

Accomack County (Va.) powers of attorney and letters relating to slaves of Bull and Warner

Label
Accomack County (Va.) powers of attorney and letters relating to slaves of Bull and Warner, 1839
Title
Accomack County (Va.) powers of attorney and letters relating to slaves of Bull and Warner
Inclusive dates
1839
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Accomack County (Va.) powers of attorney and letters relating to slaves of Bull and Warner, 1839, includes three letters from William Hugg of Camden, New Jersey to James Ailworth of Accomack County. Hugg notified Ailworth that he had captured and imprisoned slaves that belonged to the estates of John Bull, Sr., and Jacob Warner. Ailworth was the administrator of Bull's estate. Hugg requested Ailworth to send someone to recover the slaves. In one of the letters, he references abolitionists. The collection also includes two powers of attorney that gave representatives of Warner and Bull's estates the authority to recover the slaves
Member of
Action
Described.
Biographical or historical data
Accomack County was named for the Accomac Indians, who lived on the Eastern Shore at the time of the first English settlement in Virginia. The word means "on-the-other-side-of-water place" or "across the water." It was one of the original eight shires, or counties, first enumerated in 1634 and spelled Accomac without the k. The county's name was changed to Northampton County in 1643. The present county was formed from Northampton about 1663. In October 1670, the General Assembly temporarily reunited Accomack and Northampton Counties as Northampton County. In November 1673, Accomack County was again separated from Northampton. In early records, the county's name was spelled many ways. In 1940 the General Assembly adopted the present spelling, Accomack. The county gained a small part of the southern end of Smith's Island from Somerset County, Maryland, in 1879, after the United States had approved boundary changes between Virginia and Maryland that had been agreed to in 1877. The county seat is Accomac.
Cataloging source
Vi
Label
Accomack County (Va.) powers of attorney and letters relating to slaves of Bull and Warner
Note
These items came to the Library of Virginia in transfers of court papers from Accomack County under the accession number 44262
Arrangement
Chronological.
http://library.link/vocab/branchCode
  • The Library of Virginia
Extent
10
Governing access note
There are no restrictions
Immediate source of acquisition
Accomack County Circuit Court
http://library.link/vocab/recordID
001685133
Terms governing use
There are no restrictions.
Type of unit
p.

Library Locations

    • Library of VirginiaBorrow it
      800 East Broad Street, Richmond, VA, 23219, US
      37.5415632 -77.4360805
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