The Resource Agency history

Agency history

Label
Agency history
Title
Agency history
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Action
Described
Biographical or historical data
  • The creation of the Governor's Office for Substance Abuse Prevention was authorized by the 2000 General Assembly, signed into law by Governor James S. Gilmore III., and codified through 2.2-118 of the Code of Virginia. The code notes the governor's responsibility to authorize, direct, and coordinate the Commonwealth's substance abuse prevention activities. To assist the governor in meeting this responsibility, the code also authorizes the creation of the Governor's Office for Substance Abuse Prevention; an office designated to coordinate the substance abuse prevention activities of Commonwealth agencies, to review substance abuse prevention activity expenditures, and to determine new directions for future substance abuse prevention funding. Initially, the office reported to the Governor's Chief of Staff and was overseen by Benjamin W. Smith, whom Governor Gilmore appointed as the office's first director. To give the office more public visibility, Governor Mark R. Warner opted to place it within the Office of the Secretary of Public Safety as an autonomous and independent entity.
  • In April 2002, Governor Warner appointed Marilyn P. Harris, Deputy Secretary of Public Safety for Secretary of Public Safety John W. Marshall, to the post of Director of the Governor's Office for Substance Abuse Prevention. As of December 2005, the office had a staff of three at-will employees and several interns.
  • The Governor's Office for Substance Abuse Prevention fulfills two primary functions. One primary function is to coordinate the prevention activities of Commonwealth agencies. In 2003, the office formed the Governor's Office of Substance Abuse Prevention Collaborative from thirteen Commonwealth agencies charged with substance abuse prevention activities. The purpose of the Collaborative as designed is to improve interagency communication, facilitate cooperation, increase consistency, and ensure that all member agencies work together towards a common set of substance abuse prevention goals. The member agencies are as follows: The Department of Education, The Department of Criminal Justice Services, The Department of Juvenile Justice, The Department of Alcohol and Beverage Control, The Virginia State Police, The Virginia Department of Health, The Department of Social Services, The Department of Mental Health and Mental Retardation Substance Abuse Services, The Department of Motor Vehicles, The Virginia Department of Fire Programs, The Virginia Tobacco Settlement Foundation, and The Virginia National Guard.
  • The other primary function of the office is to solicit, review, and award grants to organizations working in support of substance abuse prevention initiatives. As of 2005, the office administered two federal grants; the Governor's portion of the Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act funding as granted by the U.S. Department of Education, and the State Incentive Grant Cooperative Agreement as granted by the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration.
  • The Governor's Office for Substance Abuse Prevention also administers or participates in several statewide substance abuse prevention programs. The Virginia State Incentive Grant Project was created in October of 2000 to work in conjunction with the federal Center for Abuse Prevention and to award local prevention coalitions grants to implement substance abuse prevention programs. The Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Program of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 is intended to award grants for projects in support of youth substance abuse and violence prevention efforts. KidSafe Virginia, a program launched in late 2002, is targeted towards educating children about personal safety (inclusive of online safety and fire safety) and crime prevention. The Governor's Youth Public Safety Advisory Council was created in 2003 to allow Virginia's adolescents a forum to voice concerns over school violence, gangs, substance abuse, and other safety issues. The Protect and Respect program was launched in May of 2003 to promote personal safety and awareness among Virginia's older residents and allows adolescents and senior citizens to work collaboratively to promote the safety of both through crime prevention education.
Cataloging source
VIC
Citation source
Salmon, John S., comp. A GUIDE TO STATE RECORDS IN THE ARCHIVES BRANCH OF THE VIRGINIA BRANCH OF THE VIRGINIA STATE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES. Richmond: Virginia State Library, 1985
Label
Agency history
Publication
Note
  • This is not a record. This is background information for Virginia's state government records
  • Record Group 172
http://library.link/vocab/branchCode
  • The Library of Virginia
http://library.link/vocab/recordID
001550920

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