The Resource Certificate of Governor James Wood

Certificate of Governor James Wood

Label
Certificate of Governor James Wood, 1797 July 31
Title
Certificate of Governor James Wood
Inclusive dates
1797 July 31
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Contains a certificate of Governor James Wood that Jaquelin Ambler is treasurer of the Commonwealth, Samuel Shephard is auditor, and William Price is register of the Land Office. The document includes a receipt on account of the Land Office of John Patrick, Francis McConnell, & Thomas McCullock dated 15 October 1779 copied from the Treasury Book by Jaquelin Ambler. Also includes a certificate of Samuel Shepard, Auditor, regarding a copy of a certificate from Thomas Everard that Francis McConnell has delivered the treasurer's receipt for waste and unappropriated lands. Lastly, there is a certificate of William Price, Register, regarding six Land Office treasury warrants issued to Francis McConnell
Note
Agency history record describes the history and functions of the Virginia Governor's Office. (Search Virginia Governor's Office as author).
Member of
Action
  • Accessioned
  • Described
Biographical or historical data
  • James Wood, Jr., was born in Winchester, Virginia, on 28 January 1741, to Col. James Wood and Mary Rutherford. His public service began at a young age as deputy clerk and deputy surveyor for Frederick County, while also serving as clerk of the vestry of Frederick Parish. In 1766, Wood began his first term as a representative to Frederick County in the House of Burgesses, serving in that capacity until 1775. Wood married Jean Moncure of Stafford County in 1775 and settled at Hawthorn, the home built on his family's estate of Glen Burnie in Winchester.
  • Wood had a distinguished military career beginning as a captain during Dunmore's War and continuing as colonel of the 8th Virginia Regiment Continental Line during the Revolution. In 1779, Wood became Post Commandant of the Albemarle Barracks in Charlottesville which accommodated the Convention Army Guard created to guard the prisoners taken from John Burgoyne's army on 17 October 1777. In 1781, he was named Commissioner of Prisoners for Virginia and Maryland. By the end of the war, Wood had obtained the rank of brigadier general of Virginia troops. Wood was also a member of the 1st (1774) and 5th (1776) Virginia Conventions. He served two terms in the House of Delegates in 1776 and 1784-1785. During the interim, Wood was a member of the Council of State, serving as Lieutenant Governor, the head of that body, for several terms. As Lieutenant Governor, Wood performed the duties as governor on a number of occasions, most notably during the long absence of Governor Henry Lee in 1794.
  • The pinnacle of Wood's long public service came on 1 December 1796 when he was elected by the General Assembly to succeed Robert Brooke as governor of Virginia. Wood was reelected for two additional one-year terms until 6 December 1799 and his governorship was distinguished by the construction of the Virginia Penitentiary and Manufactory of Arms. Following his terms as governor, Wood returned to service on the Council of State until his death on 17 June 1813. Wood is buried at St. John's Church in Richmond.
Cataloging source
VIC
Citation source
Salmon, John S., comp. A GUIDE TO STATE RECORDS IN THE ARCHIVES BRANCH OF THE VIRGINIA BRANCH OF THE VIRGINIA STATE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES. Richmond: Virginia State Library, 1985
Label
Certificate of Governor James Wood
Note
These records are part of the Governor's Office record group (RG# 3)
http://library.link/vocab/branchCode
  • The Library of Virginia
Extent
2
Governing access note
There are no access restrictions
Organization method
Organized into the following series: Certificate of Governor James Wood, 1797.
http://library.link/vocab/recordID
001625237
Terms governing use
There are no use restrictions.
Type of unit
p.

Library Locations

    • Library of VirginiaBorrow it
      800 East Broad Street, Richmond, VA, 23219, US
      37.5415632 -77.4360805
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