The Resource Executive journal of Governor Francis H. Pierpont of the Restored Government of Virginia

Executive journal of Governor Francis H. Pierpont of the Restored Government of Virginia

Label
Executive journal of Governor Francis H. Pierpont of the Restored Government of Virginia, 1861-1865
Title
Executive journal of Governor Francis H. Pierpont of the Restored Government of Virginia
Inclusive dates
1861-1865
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Contains the Executive Journal of Governor Francis H. Pierpont of the Restored Government of Virginia. The Executive Journal provides an account of the daily business of Governor Pierpont. The journal documents the issuance of certificates of election, proclamations, commissions, pardons, release of prisoners of war, writs, rewards for the apprehension of criminals, and requisitions for the delivery of criminals
Note
Agency history record describes the history and functions of the Virginia Secretary of the Commonwealth. (Search Virginia Secretary of the Commonwealth as author).
Member of
Action
  • Accessioned
  • Described
Biographical or historical data
  • Francis Harrison Pierpont was born on January 25, 1814, just east of Morgantown, W. Va. After working on his father’s farm and tannery business in Fairmont, W. Va., Pierpont studied law at Allegheny College in Meadville, Pa., in 1835. He was admitted into the bar in 1842 and served as counsel for the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad until 1856. Pierpont was also involved in various business ventures including mining and shipping coal by rail. In December 1854, Pierpont married Julia Robinson, the daughter of a Presbyterian minister. Pierpont was an active member of the Whig political party and an anti-slavery proponent. Although he did not hold political office, Pierpont acted as a spokesman for northwest Virginia delivering speeches and writing commentaries in the newspapers attacking the Democrats and slavery. When the Virginia Convention voted on April 17, 1861, to pass the Ordinance of Secession, mass meetings were held in opposition to secession in northwest Virginia. Pierpont took an active part in these meetings and in the Wheeling Convention on May 13, 1861, in which he represented Marion County. The Convention voted to defy the Secession Convention. The Second Wheeling Convention met on June 11, 1861, and Piepont was unanimously elected governor of the Restored Government of Virginia on June 20, 1861 with the recognition of President Lincoln.
  • As governor of the Restored Government of Virginia at Wheeling, Pierpont concentrated on raising regiments and commissioning officers for the Union cause. Meanwhile, continued calls for a new state to be created from the existing state of Virginia resulted in "An Ordinance to Provide for the Formation of a New State out of a Portion of the Territory of this State" at the Second Wheeling Convention. A special session of the Assembly adjourned on May 15, 1862, and Congress was presented with the constitution and proposal for the new state of West Virginia. The Senate passed the bill admitting West Virginia on July 14, 1862, and the House of Representatives on December 10, 1862. With prodding by Pierpont, President Lincoln signed the bill creating the state. West Virginia did not officially enter into the Union until June 20, 1863. Arthur I. Boreman became the first governor of the new state at this time and Pierpont continued as governor of the state of Virginia (which consisted of the counties of Alexandria, Fairfax, Loudoun, Accomac, Northampton, and Norfolk) in the new capital at Alexandria.
  • Pierpont was again elected governor for a four-year term on May 28, 1863. During this time, Pierpont clashed with General Benjamin F. Butler who was appointed to command the eastern military district of Virginia and North Carolina in Norfolk. Butler abused his military authority, according to Pierpont, by controlling the liquor traffic in Norfolk and through his disregard for the civil authority there. President Lincoln intervened in this controversy and Butler was removed of his command following a Congressional investigation. Following Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation, Pierpont called for a new Constitutional Convention. The Convention assembled on February 3, 1864, and adjourned on April 11, 1864, having adopted an amendment for the abolition of slavery. Following the Civil War and the death of President Lincoln, the Virginia government, under Pierpont, was removed to Richmond by an executive order of President Johnson on May 9, 1865. Pierpont finished his 4-year term on April 4, 1868. He died at the home of his daughter in Pittsburgh, Pa., on March 24, 1899.
Cataloging source
VIC
Citation source
Salmon, John S., comp. A GUIDE TO STATE RECORDS IN THE ARCHIVES BRANCH OF THE VIRGINIA BRANCH OF THE VIRGINIA STATE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES. Richmond: Virginia State Library, 1985
Label
Executive journal of Governor Francis H. Pierpont of the Restored Government of Virginia
Note
These records are part of the Secretary of the Commonwealth record group (RG# 13)
Arrangement
Arranged chronologically.
http://library.link/vocab/branchCode
  • The Library of Virginia
Extent
1
Governing access note
There are no access restrictions
Organization method
Organized into the following series: Executive Journal of Governor Francis H. Pierpont of the Restored Government of Virginia, 1861-1865.
http://library.link/vocab/recordID
001669942
Terms governing use
There are no use restrictions.
Type of unit
v. (97 p.)

Library Locations

    • Library of VirginiaBorrow it
      800 East Broad Street, Richmond, VA, 23219, US
      37.5415632 -77.4360805
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