The Resource Executive papers of Governor James L. Kemper

Executive papers of Governor James L. Kemper

Label
Executive papers of Governor James L. Kemper, 1874-1877
Title
Executive papers of Governor James L. Kemper
Inclusive dates
1874-1877
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
  • Governor James L. Kemper's Executive papers are organized chronologically with undated items arranged at the rear of the collection. These papers consist of incoming correspondence during Kemp's four-year terms as governor of Virginia between 1 January 1874 and 1 January 1878. The correspondence primarily relates to the state war debt; prisoners and the Penitentiary, arms and the militia, the Petersburg city government bill veto, recommendations and appointments to State government offices, the International Exhibition of 1876 in Philadelphia, a statue dedicated to Stonewall Jackson in Capitol Square, the equestrian statue of General Robert E. Lee, and the Virginia Military Institute. In addition to correspondence, there are recommendations, applications, agreements, resolutions, requisitions, appointments, commissions, reports, petitions, and other sundry items
  • Noteworthy correspondence originates from the Federal government, Virginia state government, Governors from other states, and miscellaneous sources. Federal government correspondents include Thomas M. Vincent, Assistant Adjutant General; S.V. Benet, Brig. Gen. Chief of Ordnance, War Dept.; William W. Belknap & J. Donald Cameron, Secretaries of War; John L. Cadwallader, Assistant Dept. of State; Eppa Hunton, House of Representatives; and Rufus Ingalls, Acting Quartermaster General
  • Significant correspondents from Virginia State government include Raleigh T. Daniel, Attorney General; William H. Richardson, Adjutant General; and Francis H. Smith, Superintendent of the Virginia Military Institute
  • Governors from other states comprise a significant amount of correspondence received by the governor. This correspondence mostly relates to fugitives, boundary lines, Indian affairs, mutineers, and other subjects. Included are letters from the following governors: John J. Jacob, West Virginia; James B. Groome & John Lee Carroll, Maryland; Charles H. Hardin, Missouri; John P. Cochran, Delaware; Augustus H. Garland, Arkansas; James D. Porter, Tennessee; and Zebulon B. Vance, North Carolina
  • Miscellaneous correspondents to Governor Kemper include Kemper’s fellow Confederate generals Jubal A. Early and George E. Pickett
Note
Agency history record describes the history and functions of the Virginia Governor's Office. (Search Virginia Governor's Office as author).
Member of
Action
  • Accessioned
  • Described
Biographical or historical data
  • James Lawson Kemper was born 11 June 1823 at "Mountain Prospect" in Madison County, Virginia, to William Kemper (1776-1853) and Maria E. Allison Kemper (1787-1873). He attended the Locust Dale Academy, then Washington College (now Washington and Lee University) in Lexington, Virginia, graduating in 1842. He read law under George W. Summers (1804-1868) of Kanawha County, (West) Virginia, and received a master's degree from Washington College. Admitted to the bar 2 October 1846, Kemper returned to Madison County to practice law. When the Mexican War began, Kemper was appointed captain in the First Virginia Regiment and served until the end of the war. In 1853, Kemper was elected to the House of Delegates and served until 1863. He was Speaker of the House from 1861 to 1863. Kemper also was appointed a general in the Virginia militia in 1858. When the Civil War began, Kemper was appointed colonel of the 7th Virginia Infantry. Due to his performance at the battle of Seven Pines, Kemper was promoted to brigadier general. He was wounded in Pickett's Charge on 3 July 1863, and was captured by Union troops a few days later. Exchanged in September 1863, he returned to his command. Kemper was put in command of the reserve forces of Virginia in 1864.
  • After the war ended, Kemper returned to his law practice in Madison County and pursued business interests. He was elected governor of Virginia in 1873 and served from 1874 to 1878. Much of his term was spent in dealing with Virginia's debt. On 12 March 1874, Kemper created controversy and angered his Conservative contemporaries by vetoing a bill to transfer control of Petersburg’s city government from elected Republican officials to a board of commissioners appointed by a city judge. Governor Kemper also played an integral part in the unveiling of John Henry Foley’s statue to Stonewall Jackson on Capitol Square.
  • After he left the governor's office, Kemper returned to Madison County, then moved to Orange County in 1882. Kemper married Cremora Conway Cave (ca. 1837-1870) 4 July 1853 in Madison County, and they had seven children. Kemper died 7 April 1895 in Orange County and buried at the family cemetery at "Walnut Hills" in Madison County.
Cataloging source
VIC
Citation source
Salmon, John S., comp. A GUIDE TO STATE RECORDS IN THE ARCHIVES BRANCH OF THE VIRGINIA BRANCH OF THE VIRGINIA STATE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES. Richmond: Virginia State Library, 1985
Label
Executive papers of Governor James L. Kemper
Link
http://ead.lib.virginia.edu/vivaead/published/lva/vi03130.xml.frame
Note
These records are part of the Governor's Office record group (RG# 3)
Arrangement
Arranged chronologically.
http://library.link/vocab/branchCode
  • The Library of Virginia
Cumulative index finding aids
  • Inventory
  • Inventory
Extent
1.8
Governing access note
There are no access restrictions
Organization method
Organized into the following series: Series I. Executive papers of Governor James L. Kemper, 1874-1877.
http://library.link/vocab/recordID
001634270
Terms governing use
There are no use restrictions.
Type of unit
cu. ft. (6 boxes)

Subject

Genre

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Library Locations

    • Library of VirginiaBorrow it
      800 East Broad Street, Richmond, VA, 23219, US
      37.5415632 -77.4360805
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