The Resource LOCATED IN OVERSIZE

LOCATED IN OVERSIZE

Label
1841-1851
Inclusive dates
1841-1851
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Journal, 1841-1851, of Edmund Ruffin (1794-1865) of Hanover County, Virginia, containing a detailed daily summary of Ruffin's farming activities on his plantation "Marlbourne" in Hanover County, Virginia. Included are his descriptions of the improvements he made, and agricultural experiments which he conducted. The journal is illustrated with diagrams of his fields, as well as charts indicating the types and amounts of crops planted. Weather conditions are also noted. There are also clippings of newspaper articles Ruffin wrote which appeared in the Richmond Whig and the Richmond Enquirer. At the beginning of the journal are minutes for the first meeting of the State Board of Agriculture for 6-10 December 1841. Ruffin was recording secretary for the Board
Member of
Action
  • Accessioned
  • Described
Biographical or historical data
Edmund Ruffin was born 5 January 1794 at Evergreen in Prince George County, Virginia, to Jane Lucas Ruffin (d. 1794) and George Ruffin (1765-1810). After briefly attending the College of William and Mary, Ruffin returned to Prince George County to manage his plantation at Coggins Point. The poor condition of the land at Coggins Point led Ruffin to experiment in agricultural techniques and he emerged as a leading proponent of agricultural reform. He represented Prince George, Greensville, Isle of Wight, Southampton, Surry, and Sussex Counties in the Virginia Senate from 1823 to 1826. In 1828, Ruffin moved to a new home in Prince George County called Shellbanks, where in 1832, he began publishing the FARMERS' REGISTER in which he advocated agricultural reform. Ruffin moved to Petersburg, Virginia, in 1835 to concentrate on his publication, but it failed in 1842. In 1843, Ruffin served as the state agricultural surveyor of South Carolina. In 1844, he returned to Virginia and settled at Marlbourne in Hanover County, Virginia. He continued to work for agricultural reform and also became a Southern nationalist, advocating secession. When South Carolina seceded from the Union in 1861, Ruffin went to Charleston, South Carolina and joined the Palmetto Guards. He is credited with firing the first shot of the assault on Fort Sumter 12 April 1861. After the Civil War began, Ruffin returned to his plantation Marlbourne. After the war ended, Ruffin moved to his son Edmund's plantation Redmoor in Amelia County, Virginia. There he committed suicide 17 June 1865, lamenting the failure of the South's efforts to secede. He was buried at Marlbourne. Ruffin married Susan Hutchings Travis (1793-1843) about 1812, and they had twelve children.
Cataloging source
Vi
Form designation
Journal
Label
LOCATED IN OVERSIZE
Note
LOCATED IN OVERSIZE
http://library.link/vocab/branchCode
  • The Library of Virginia
Extent
1
Immediate source of acquisition
Ruffin, Julian N.
http://library.link/vocab/recordID
000494345
Type of unit
v. (494 p.)

Library Locations

    • Library of VirginiaBorrow it
      800 East Broad Street, Richmond, VA, 23219, US
      37.5415632 -77.4360805
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