The Resource Letter of Samuel S. McCroskey

Letter of Samuel S. McCroskey

Label
Letter of Samuel S. McCroskey, 1775 Nov. 25
Title
Letter of Samuel S. McCroskey
Inclusive dates
1775 Nov. 25
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Contains a letter from Samuel S. McCroskey, Northampton County, to the Committee of Safety enclosing a copy of his express letter as chairman of the Northampton County committee to the general Congress. In his letter to the Committee of Safety, McCroskey explains the delay in procurring ammunition. In his letter to Congress, McCroskey provides intelligence on Lord Dunmore at Norfolk and Princess Anne. McCroskey also mentions the joining of slaves to Dunmore's cause and the fear that he will enlist more slaves in Northampton
Note
Agency history record describes the history and functions of the Virginia Committee of Safety. (Search Virginia Committee of Safety as author).
Member of
Action
  • Accessioned
  • Described
Additional physical form
  • Microfilm available on Misc. Reels 619 and 620.
  • Printed text appears in William J. Van Schreeven, Robert L. Scribner, and Brent Tarter, eds., Revolutionary Virginia: The Road to Independence; A Documentary Record (Charlottesville: Published for the Virginia Independence Bicentennial Commission by the University Press of Virginia, 1973-1983), 7 vols.
Biographical or historical data
  • On August 1, 1774, with the meeting of Virginia's first revolutionary convention, the advocates of change took the first step toward creating a government in opposition to royal authority in the colony. That new government was firmly established in July 1775 when the Committee of Safety was formed to serve as the executive agency based on an ordinance adopted on August 24, 1775, by the third revolutionary convention. Until Patrick Henry became governor on July 6, 1776, the committee served as the executive authority of the government.
  • The eleven man committee controlled military and civilian matters when the Convention was not in session. The power of the Committee was considerable, since it commanded a permanent army and, to meet the needs of the war, it had the authority to become involved in the economy to an extent unknown before. Besides enforcing the ban on British trade and procuring supplies for the army, the delegates extended the authority to operate cannon works at Fredericksburg and lead mines in Fincastle County, as well as subsidize the production of sulfur and saltpeter for gunpowder.
Cataloging source
VIC
Citation source
Salmon, John S., comp. A GUIDE TO STATE RECORDS IN THE ARCHIVES BRANCH OF THE VIRGINIA BRANCH OF THE VIRGINIA STATE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES. Richmond: Virginia State Library, 1985
Label
Letter of Samuel S. McCroskey
Note
These records are part of the Revolutionary Government record group (RG# 2)
Arrangement
Arranged chronologically.
http://library.link/vocab/branchCode
  • The Library of Virginia
Cumulative index finding aids
Accession analysis with list of content
Extent
6
Governing access note
Restricted access: use microfilm
Organization method
Organized into the following series: General Correspondence of the Committee of Safety, 1775-1776.
http://library.link/vocab/recordID
001631539
Terms governing use
There are no use restrictions.
Type of unit
p.

Library Locations

    • Library of VirginiaBorrow it
      800 East Broad Street, Richmond, VA, 23219, US
      37.5415632 -77.4360805
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