The Resource !UNKNOWN LABEL

!UNKNOWN LABEL

Label
1781-1825
Inclusive dates
1781-1825
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Letters, 1781-1825, of Marie Joseph Paul Yves Roch Gilbert Du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette (1757-1834) of France, consisting of letters, 1781, from Lafayette to Governor Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826) of Virginia concerning the military situation in Virginia; letters, 1781, to General Robert Lawson (1748-1805) of the Virginia militia calling on the militia to cooperate in opposing the British army; and a letter, 2 July 1781, to General "Mad" Anthony Wayne (1745-1796) praising the ground reconnoitered by Wayne for use of the army. Papers also include a certification, 18 August 1778, by John Paul Jones (1747-1792) regarding Benjamin Hill; letter, 10 December 1781, from Charles Alexander de Colonne (1734-1802), Arras, France, to Louis Philippe count de Segur (1753-1830) regarding a Te Deum for French successes in the American Revolution; a letter, 27 September 1781, from Armand Louis de Gontaut, duc de Lauzun (1747-1793) to Antoine Charles du Houx, baron de Viomenil (1725-1793) commenting on the comte de Rochambeau (1725-1807) and discussing the Franco-American siege of the British in the town of Yorktown, Virginia; and a letter, 16 July 1825, from President John Quincy Adams (1767-1848) to Lafayette regarding the latter's United States tour. Letters include typed transcripts and translations of letters written in French
Member of
Action
  • Accessioned
  • Described
Biographical or historical data
Marie Joseph Paul Yves Roch Gilbert Du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette was born 6 September 1757 at the Chateau de Chavaniac, Haute-Loire, Avergne, France. He inherited a vast estate when orphaned at age 13 and joined the French army at age 14. When the American Revolution began, Lafayette, 19, offered his services to the Continental Army and was commissioned a major-general. He served ably throughout the Revolution and was instrumental in convincing Franch to join the war on the American side. After the Revolution, Lafayette returned to France and later sat in its assembly. Commander of the French army int he early stages of the French Revolution, Lafayette fell out of favor with the more radical elements of the revolutionaries and was declared a traitor. Escaping France, he was held prisoner by the Austrians and the Prussians from 1792 to 1797. Returning to France in 1799, Lafayette participated off and on in French politics as a liberal. Lafayette returned to the United States for a triumphal tour in 1824-1825. He married Marie-Adrienne-Francoise de Noailles, and they had three children. Lafayette died 20 May 1834.
Cataloging source
Vi
Form designation
Letters
Label
!UNKNOWN LABEL
http://library.link/vocab/branchCode
  • The Library of Virginia
Cumulative index finding aids
  • Inventory
  • Inventory
Extent
48
Immediate source of acquisition
Jackson, Stuart W.
http://library.link/vocab/recordID
000501300
Reproduction note
Photostats (negative).
Type of unit
leaves.

Library Locations

    • Library of VirginiaBorrow it
      800 East Broad Street, Richmond, VA, 23219, US
      37.5415632 -77.4360805
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