The Resource !UNKNOWN LABEL

!UNKNOWN LABEL

Label
1884 Apr. 24
Inclusive dates
1884 Apr. 24
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Letter, dated 24 April 1884, from Jubal Anderson Early (1816-1894) of Lynchburg, Virginia, to Richard F. Beirne (1856-1891) of Richmond, Virginia, discussing "outrageous" articles written by Thomas L. Rosser (1836-1910) and published in the Philadelphia Times. Early asks Beirne to publish the enclosed rebuttal, which is not included. Beirne's paper, the State, published Early's article 28 April 1884
Member of
Action
  • Accessioned
  • Described
Biographical or historical data
Jubal Anderson Early was born 3 November 1816 in Franklin County, Virginia. He graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1837. After resigning from the military, he studied law and began practicing in Rocky Mount, Virginia. He represented Franklin County in the House of Delegates during the 1841-1842 session. Early also served as Commonwealth's Attorney. During the Mexican War, he was a major of Virginia volunteers. Voting against secession as Franklin County's representative to the Convention of 1861, Early, however, immediately entered Confederate service as the colonel of the 24th Virginia Infantry. Early commanded this unit at the first Battle of Manassas and was promoted to brigadier-general 21 July 1861. Early served with the Army of Northern Virginia for all its campaigns between 1862 and 1864. On 31 May 1864, Early was promoted to lieutenant-general and commanded the 2nd corps. After the Battle of Cold Harbor, Early was sent to the Shenandoah Valley to campaign against Union troops there. Early defeated the troops in the Valley, then led his corps on Washington D.C., arriving at the capital 11 July 1864. However, he retreated when the Union 6th corps arrived in Washington. Early made a second raid north of the Potomac River into Maryland and Pennsylvania, burning the town of Chambersburg, Pennsylvania. In September 1864, Early suffered defeats in the Valley at Winchester and Fisher's Hill and a surprise attack on Union troops at Cedar Creek was thwarted. Early's command was defeated and dispersed by Union troops at Waynesboro, Virginia, in March 1865. After Appomattox, Early went to Mexico, before returning to Virginia to practice law in Lynchburg. Early served as president of the Southern Historical Society, and wrote often about the war. He died 2 March 1894 in Lynchburg.
Cataloging source
Vi
Form designation
Letter
Label
!UNKNOWN LABEL
http://library.link/vocab/branchCode
  • The Library of Virginia
Extent
2
Immediate source of acquisition
Beirne, Mary McD.
http://library.link/vocab/recordID
000499897
Type of unit
p.

Library Locations

    • Library of VirginiaBorrow it
      800 East Broad Street, Richmond, VA, 23219, US
      37.5415632 -77.4360805
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