The Resource !UNKNOWN LABEL

!UNKNOWN LABEL

Label
1862-1863
Inclusive dates
1862-1863
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
File copies of letters and telegrams, 1862-1863, of General G. T. Beauregard (1818-1893) of Louisiana discussing the strategic importance of Corinth, Mississippi; his replacement in command of the western army by General Braxton Bragg (1817-1876); the military situation in the western Confederacy; Beauregard's health; Beauregard's comments on the defense of Mobile, Alabama, and Charleston, South Carolina; and his review on the possibility of retaking New Orleans, Louisiana, from the Union army; and defects of Confederate iron clads
Member of
Action
  • Accessioned
  • Described
Additional physical form
Photocopies available (LVA accession 21324).
Biographical or historical data
Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard was born 28 May 1818 in Saint Bernard Parish, Louisiana. Graduating second in the class of 1838 from West Point, he served as an engineer officer on the staff of General Winfield Scott during the Mexican war and earned two brevets. In January 1861, Beauregard was appointed superintendent of the United States Military Academy, but was relieved shortly thereater. Resigning his commission from the United States army in February 1861, he accepted a commission as a brigadier-general in the Confederate army 1 March. Commanding the troops in Charleston, South Carolina, Beauregard directed the siege of Fort Sumter culminating in its surrender 13 April 1861, starting the Civil War. Beauregard was second in command during the 1st battle of Bull Run (Manassas) and received a commission as a full general dating from 21 July 1861. Second in command to Albert Sidney Johnston (1803-1862)in the West, Beauregard took command of Confederate forces at Shiloh, Tennessee, when Johnston was killed, 6-7 April 1862, and retreated to Corinth, Mississippi, which was later abandoned due to a large Union advance. Ill, Beauregard took leave and was replaced in command by Braxton Bragg (1817-1876). He later commanded the defense of the South Carolina and Georgia coasts, most notably defending Charleston from assaults in 1863 and 1864. In May 1864, Beauregard commanded troops in Virginia, and prevented Union troops from capturing Petersburg, Virginia. Second in command to Joseph E. Johnston (1807-1891) when the war ended, Beauregard returned to New Orleans, Louisiana. After the Civil War, he served as the president of two railroads and supervised the drawings of the Louisiana lottery. Beauregard died 20 February 1893 and was buried in New Orleans.
Cataloging source
Vi
Form designation
Papers
Label
!UNKNOWN LABEL
Link
http://ead.lib.virginia.edu/vivaead/published/lva/vivadoc.pl?file=vi01727.xml
http://library.link/vocab/branchCode
  • The Library of Virginia
Cumulative index finding aids
  • Inventory
  • Inventory
Extent
  • 3
  • 25
Immediate source of acquisition
Kievit, Basil
http://library.link/vocab/recordID
000499334
Type of unit
  • leaves and
  • p.

Library Locations

    • Library of VirginiaBorrow it
      800 East Broad Street, Richmond, VA, 23219, US
      37.5415632 -77.4360805
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