The Resource !UNKNOWN LABEL

!UNKNOWN LABEL

Label
!UNKNOWN LABEL
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Memorandum, n.d., of a conversation which occurred in March 1832 between Thomas Henry Bayly (1809-1856) of Accomack County, Virginia, and Chief Justice of the Supreme Court John Marshall (1755-1835) regarding the speeches of himself, William Grayson (1740-1790), Patrick Henry (1736-1799), James Madison (1751-1836), George Mason (1725-1792), James Monroe (1758-1831), and Edmund Randolph (1753-1813) in the Virginia ratifying convention of 1788, and how they were reported in the press. There are two copies of this memorandum
Member of
Action
  • Accessioned
  • Described
Biographical or historical data
Thomas Henry Bayly was born 11 December 1809 in Accomack County, Virginia, to Thomas Monteagle Bayly (1775-1834) and Margaret Pettit Cropper Bayly. He attended private schools, then attended the University of Virginia where he studied law. Bayly was admitted to the bar in 1831. In 1836 he was elected to the Virginia House of Delegates and represented Accomack County there until 1842. In 1837 he was appointed a general in the Virginia militia. In 1842, Bayly was elected a judge on the circuit court, but resigned in 1844. That same year he was elected to the United States House of Representatives where he served until his death. Bayly held several important committee chairs and supported the Compromise of 1850 while in Congress. He married Evelyn Harrison May (1819-1897) of Petersburg, Virginia, 11 May 1837 and they had 2 daughters. Bayly died 22 June 1856.
Cataloging source
Vi
Form designation
Memorandum
Label
!UNKNOWN LABEL
http://library.link/vocab/branchCode
  • The Library of Virginia
Extent
4
Immediate source of acquisition
Sands, Alexander H.
http://library.link/vocab/recordID
000503322
Reproduction note
Photostats (positive and negative).
Type of unit
leaves.

Library Locations

    • Library of VirginiaBorrow it
      800 East Broad Street, Richmond, VA, 23219, US
      37.5415632 -77.4360805
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